SRL Seasonings – More S’mores

Whether it is a balmy Saturday, or pelting the snow down – our bonfires are a source of enjoyment for guests of all ages. While most of you know that SRL’s brand of camping is different than others (luxury cabins, gourmet meals, a 150+ variety wine list) when it comes to the basics, like a good campfire, we’ve got it covered.

Aside from that lovely smokey smell, the sound of cracking wood and the romantic warmth that the bonfire provides, one of our favorite things about a good bonfire are the s’mores!

Let’s start with the graham cracker. Having the perfect graham is one of the most important factors! Each perforated line ensures even heat distribution and a fresh graham provides the right amount of crunch. Thanks Rev. Sylvester Graham for providing the perfect plate for Step #2 – the chocolate.

Chocolate is a personal choice and can make or break the tastiness of a s’more. Die hard bittersweet fans balk at the thought of milk or worse, white, chocolate contaminating their marshmallow graham sandwich. What ever your preference, those squares of sweetness certainly tie the components together.

Finally – the crown jewel of the s’more empire – the marshmallow. Whether it be homemade, or store bought, the marshmallow literally provides the glue that holds it together. There’s a science to the process. First the marshmallow swells as the moisture inside heats and expands. The water breaks through the porous body and escapes as steam. After being depleted of moisture, the marshmallow is now charred sugar and oxygen in the air sets is aflame. As carbon atoms grab onto oxygen atoms, carbon monoxide, then carbon dioxide, are formed – which is the oxidation process. If you’re from the toasty school of cooking, not flambe, then your marshmallow ceases oxidization after you pull it from the flames. It you like a little fire with your s’more, the combustion process is complete!

Marshmallow Roasting Scale, from visualnews.com

Assemble your layers, grab a napkin and dig in!

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